Food in Qing dynasty compare with modern Chinese food

Food in Qing dynasty compare with modern Chinese food

Food in Qing dynasty compare with modern Chinese food
According to an article from a JSTOR, the Chinese people have been undergoing through many changes. The journal also talks about the Qing dynasty that existed in the 17th and 20th century, between 1644 and 1911. The material is very elaborative covering the food that was taken during this time in comparison with the food that is being taken by the Chinese people. According to the journal, there was a very significant role served and a huge effect on the Chinese dietetic culture by the imperial food that was being served within the walls of the Forbidden City by the Qing Dynasty. The journal goes ahead to state there has been a need to interlink the cultures regularly practiced by the Chinese people over time. For instance, there was a need to develop the dietetic culture of the Qing palace. There was also assimilation of foods from the Han ethnic group. Assimilation encompassed that of Chinese dietetic culture, and Manchu ethic group’s traditional diet. By utilizing the information contained in this material, the researcher will be able to get in depth information that will be significant and of relevance to the research problem. For instance, he/she will be able to study the developmental changes that the Chinese people have undergone in relation to the foods.
Another journal from Washington State University (WSU) finds that people who lived during the Qing dynasty were dear to edible bird’s nest and shark’s fin. According to the article from Washington State University (WSU), these two foods still remain significant and are indispensable ingredients up to the modern times. According to the journal, the two types of food were obtained from south East Asia and brought into China. This was during the times of Zheng He, who had returned from South East Asia. At the extravagant banquets, and during the middle ages of the Qing Dynasty, the menus were always headed by shark’s fin and edible bird’s nest. Other native foods in china include prawns and sea cucumbers. However, these foods became imperial dishes in later years in China. Utilizing this material will enable the researcher in finding out the foods that have remained significant among the Chinese people over the years, and specifically from the period when the Qing Dynasty was in existence.
According to some pundits, there were some scholars who gained interest in cooking during the Qing dynasty. They recorded much information in regard to the knowledge applied by the cooks and chefs, their creativity, the recipes, and the processes involved. Some of these recipes, knowledge, and processes have widely been used in the preparation of meals during the modern times. China has undergone civilization process but despite such changes, some of the dishes used during the early years have remained significant up to the modern times. However, according to Paveliuc-Olariu, people struggled more for food during Qing dynasty compared to the modern times. This material is significant in this research as it will enable the researcher in understanding the creativities that have been adopted over the years, as far as Chinese food is considered.
Up to date, the diet remains an import cuisine to all Chinese people both those living in China and abroad. The Qing palace imperial meals were very significant and formed a very important part in the day to day life of the royal family. All the dynasties in China were largely impacted by the sumptuous courses in China. Such aspects encompassed the costs, variety, the number of people involved, and the rites of the meals.

Bibliography
Paveliuc-Olariu, Codrin. “Food security as a trigger for civil unrest.”Advances in agriculture & Botanics-International Journal of the Bioflux Society 5, no. 3(2013): 174-178.
Ward, Cheryl. “The sadana island shipwreck: An eighteenth century AD merchantman off the red sea coast of Egypt.” JSTOR World Archeology 32, no. 3 (2007): 368-382.
Washington State Gambling Commission, “International examiner,” Asian American Journal 35, no. 4 (2008): 1-16.